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Article called "Aging Eyes" [Jan. 30th, 2009|09:28 pm]
Whole Dog Journal

bumblebeez
Hello!

Does anyone have the article "Aging Eyes" or remember it anyway? I'm not sure what issue it is -- the website (whole-dog-journal.com) doesn't state.

I wanna see what WDJ says about cataracts cuz I think my old girl's gettin' some.
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Stimulus Control [Sep. 27th, 2007|10:11 pm]
Whole Dog Journal

miss_teacher
October 2007
Volume 10
Number 10

Stimulus Control page 14

Not many people train in the order that Pat Miller describes. My clients are so quick and eager to start issuing verbal commands to their dogs that they look at me like I'm crazy when I tell them they might try waiting a few sessions before using any verbal command. We, as primates, are such verbal creatures (as explained in McConnell's "The Other End of the Leash") that it takes a lot of work for us to actively not say anything when training our dogs. So I am glad that Miller mentioned how positive trainers get the behavior first and then pair the cue word (or gesture). However, she did not write why, and I think it's important to explain to people the reasoning behind your methods. People are more like to comply if they know why you are having them do this or that. You do not have to get technical and use scientific words, just let them know why they should bother.

The article also didn't explain why positive trainers like dogs who offer behaviors. She writes that using punishment gets rid of this kind of motivation for dogs but does not say why this is a hindrance. To a lay person it might sound like a good idea and a way to make training easier.

She mentioned an intermittent schedule of reinforcement but does not explain it at all. For someone knowledgeable about behavior and it's lingo this article would make sense but would be too basic. For someone new to the field it touches too briefly on key terms and practices and would likely be confusing.

I liked Miller's steps to achieving stimulus control. I think the hardest part will be for owners to extinguish unsolicited behaviors. So many times in class I see a client ask for a sit, get a down, and then still reward the dog. o_O She mentions using a NRM and then time outs. But does not go on with suggestions in case the time out are not working (except to say to use long times outs). I think mention should be made that perhaps the dog did not fully understand the cue to begin with.

Having a command that lets the dog know he's finished or on a break is an important point. I was glad to see this in a side article. Most people are good about letting the dog know when to start a behavior, like stay, but they often forget to let the dog know when it is finished. Having a cue like this reminds me of the "at ease" command in the military. Dogs should not have to be focused on us every second of their lives, or even every second of an hour training class or a long walk. They need to just be dogs, and sniff and shake and relax.

My favorite part was the side article about teaching barking and quiet commands. I have never understood this concept and have never used it. Miller explained it well enough that I get it now. Most people think if you teach a dog to bark and reward it that the dog will not want to bark any other time and will not be a nuisance barker. That is like think your dog will never ever sit again unless a cookie is coming. There are other things in this world that reinforce a bark or a sit. This myth is what has always confused me when people suggest this technique.

However, Miller goes on to say that if you teach a "bark" you can then teach a "quiet". Now that makes sense. But, couldn't you just teach a quiet without teaching a bark? If your dog is a problem barker anyhow you will have plenty of times to reinforce "quiet" without every teaching the dog that sometimes she gets cookies for barking.
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Good Energy [Sep. 27th, 2007|09:42 pm]
Whole Dog Journal

miss_teacher
October 2007
Volume 10
Number 10

Good Energy page 9

I'm torn when it comes to alternative medical practices. On one hand, it seems like Western Medicine is starting to acknowledge that some alternative practices do have merit. There are countless personal accounts to attest to this. And as this article states, if the canine patient suddenly makes a turn around it probably cannot be from the placebo effect. Yet on the other my mind is so logical most of the time that I just cannot wrap my brain around how this kind of stuff can actually work. I can kind of see how acupressure and acupuncture might work. Somehow your nerves or muscles are responding to the needles or your pressure touches. But how the heck does something like Therapeutic Touch or Reiki work? It's all based on energy and not even touching the patient.

I want to believe. I even bought a TTouch book because I've heard such great things about it. I never actually used it yet. I read it, but it just didn't connect with me. And maybe that is my problem. This article says that you need to have a clear mind and center yourself. So if I did try and it failed, perhaps it was my own negative energy blocking the progress. And there's part of my problem. You cannot measure something like that and I subscribe to the scientific process.

I did like this article. It got me thinking about these kinds of therapy again. Maybe I'll pull out that TTouch book and give it a try. I really trust most of what WDJ has to say. I find that the majority of their writers have very similar viewpoints with mine. So maybe there is something to this kind of energy work.

Hmm, but at the end of the article it mentioned that next month they will talk about animal communication (among other things). That's another topic that is way out in left field for me. Even more so than alternative therapies, which I could lean towards. (As an aside: I had a client last year who said she was an animal communicator and could communicate with her dog. You never would have guessed it based on their interactions in class.)

So I'm a skeptic.

But I do wish this article discussed how to find a trustworthy person to do these kinds of therapies on your dog. How would I know if someone was legit? I feel the article could have had more depth.
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On Guard? [Sep. 27th, 2007|01:26 pm]
Whole Dog Journal

miss_teacher
October 2007
Volume 10
Number 10

On Guard? page 3

I loved how this article started. It quickly explained what guarding is and that any breed of dog is capable of it. I especially liked how they mentioned children are a risk and why.

The break down of different kinds of guarding was well written. I was glad to see that the article clearly pointed out that just because a dog does not guard a milkbone does not mean he will not guard a piece of dropped chicken. I feel that the average dog owner does not always think of things in such a hierarchical way. Many dog owners I meet really do not distinguish the difference between a Charlie Bear for a treat or a piece of hot dog. So this part of the article was important so people realize that just because they have not seen any guarding yet there is still potential if some amazing resource pops up one day.

The frequent quotes from well known authors give validation to the article's worthwhileness.

Because I am a mainly positive trainer I loved that the article made sure to address that physical corrections should not be used (and why).

Management is often overlooked as a valid part of successful training program. I don't know why. Maybe it's because the typical owner feels that management is really doing anything about the problem. I disagree, so I was happy the article briefly mentioned management.

Every week I nag my puppy kindergarten clients to practice trading exercises with their puppy. I wish I could photocopy this article, or at least the earl intervention part, so they realize that I really do have a method to my madness. The writer listed out a variety of toys, starting from possible low level toys to more desired ones. I think this list is very important for people so they understand that even within the category of toys there can be many different levels.

One things that confused me was the explanation of the drop it. If you start with a toy the dog does not care for or want, why would he pick it up? The writer did not specify that the dog should have take it on command.

Also, if you tell the dog to take it, and he does and you immediately tell him to drop it I worry that my dog would eventually stop picking it up, even when commanded.

The last section was again about management. The advice seems so simple but it's often overlooked by dog owners. While the dog is in training for guarding while on the bed, keep the bedroom door closed so he has no access when not in a training session. So simple, yet rarely thought up by the average person.

The side article with the levels of guarding was fantastic!

All in all I enjoyed this article. It has good basic information and laid out simple plans for being proactive with dogs or working with low level guarding. I was happy to see several pages devoted to such an important topic.


What are your thoughts?


***Edit***
Oops, forgot this part.

I loved the fact that they had a side article (what are those called?) that quited Donaldson saying that guarding is not about dominance. I am so sick of that word as well as alpha and leader. People need to realize that just because a dog guards, or growls, jumps, barks, pees, breathes, does not mean he is trying to conquer your household and then the world.
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Back Again [Sep. 27th, 2007|01:24 pm]
Whole Dog Journal

miss_teacher
Sorry it's been so long since this community's last post. My daughter just turned a year old and is finally a bit more manageable. So if anyone is still out there and reading WDJ I'm hoping to post discussion topics more frequently.
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Kitties? [Sep. 3rd, 2007|11:33 am]
Whole Dog Journal

bumblebeez
Hi friends!

Do any of you have any resources similar to WDJ but for cats?! I totally need some holistic cat tips!

Thanks :)
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Dehydrated raw foods [Mar. 22nd, 2007|12:03 am]
Whole Dog Journal

trillium_flower
I've been feeding canidae to the 10month old llab in my icon and my 8yo australian shepard mix. I'm considering switching to a dehydrated raw food like this. This particular brand was mentioned in this months whole dog journal. Does anyone have any experience feeding dehydrated foods, or this one in particular. I live in a small town on the oregon coast and can get this food locally which is another reason to consider it.


ETA Also a question of delivery. My initial thought was to stuff a kong for each of them for the morning feeding which takes about 3/4 of a cup of softened kibble with pumpkin puree. Then for an evening feeding which I can supervisor better 1/2 cup of rehydrated food mixed with raw organ meats, for dessert (or a late evening snack when I want to watch tv and knit) raw bones. Any comments on this as a time table?

Cross posted to
wholedogjournalspo_preventionrawdogs
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Nancy vs Cesar [Nov. 25th, 2006|01:24 pm]
Whole Dog Journal

miss_teacher
December 2006
Volume 9
Number 12

Editor's Note


What did everyone think of this month's editor's note? Normally Nsncy writes about articles in the journal, so I thought it was interesting she wrote about Cesar Millan even though he wasn't featured this month. I would love to see a whole article about him.
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(no subject) [Nov. 25th, 2006|12:09 am]
Whole Dog Journal

trillium_flower
I got myself a subscription for christmas (about 3 months ago), does anyone remember about how long it will be before it starts coming?
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(no subject) [Oct. 8th, 2006|03:06 pm]
Whole Dog Journal
delilahbowie
Does anyone remember the WDJ issue that offered a rebuttal to a recent JAVMA article regarding the dangers of raw feeding, specifically the presence of e. coli and salmonella in raw commercial foods? I'd like to have it handy as a reference.

Thanks!
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